September 2014
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Recent Posts

DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 56 bit key, set 1 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock cipher architecture presents two main formulations:
Dicelock Digested, and
Dicelock Indexed.

These two formulations are implemented through the following concrete C++ classes:
– DiceLockDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockDigested.h and DiceLockDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIndexed.h and DiceLockIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockIVDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockIVDigested.h and DiceLockIVDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIVIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIVIndexed.h and DiceLockIVIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSDigested.h and DiceLockXTSDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSIndexed.h and DiceLockXTSIndexed.cpp)

To achieve its targets, DiceLock makes use of the following:
DiceLock encryption architecture improves symmetric ciphers like block cipher as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Camellia, Serpent or Twofish (with 128, 192 or 256 bit length symmetric keys) with different block cipher operation modes (like CBC, CFB, OFB and XTS-AES) and stream ciphers as HC 128, HC 256, Rabbit, Salsa 20/20 128, Salsa 20/20 256, Sosemanuk 128, Sosemanuk 256 and others.

DiceLock (both configurations) makes use of the following random number tests: Frequency Test, Block Frequency Test, Cumulative Sum Forward Test, Cumulative Sum Reverse Test, Runs Test, Longest Run Of Ones Test, Rank Test, Universal Test, Approximate Entropy Test, Serial Test and Discrete Fourier Transform Test.

Additionally DiceLock Digested configuration makes use currently of following hash digest algorithms: Sha 1, Sha 224, Sha 256, Sha 384, Sha 512, Sha 512/224, Sha 512/256, Ripemd 128, Ripemd 160, Ripemd 256, Ripemd 320, Message Digest 2, Message Digest 4 or Message Digest 5.

Previous version DiceLock-x 8.0.0.1 for Linux incorporated XTS-AES (XEX-based tweaked-codebook mode with ciphertext stealing XTS block cipher operation mode algorithm) for Advanced Encryption Algorithm (AES) for 128 and 256 bit symmetric keys.

New version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is characterized by:
- several minor errors have been fixed,
- DiceLock for Linux is presented as full and complete version and can be downloaded as single package from DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object).

As the new version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is developed, all individual components must be tested and verified, and in this article we verify ARC 4 Discarding class (computing ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm with no initialization vector).

In order to perform by yourself this and all individual component verifications, Linux test driver program CheckDiceLockBaseAlgorithms-x is available to download.

To be able to download DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object) and all test driver programs, care must be taken regarding Export Policy,
any package that contains DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 can only be downloaded within the European Community right now.

At the bottom of the post you can find C++ source code being used to perform this test.

Verified DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux

Verification components:

– Stream encryption cipher algorithm: ARC4_Discarding class
– Discarded initial bytes: 240
– Test set: IETF RFC 6229, 56 bit key, set 1
– Bit stream memory management: PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

Memory characteristic used in this test:

PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class makes use of mlock that uses physical nonpaged memory, preventing that memory from being paged to the swap area, so memory is not swapped to hard disk. The pages are guaranteed to stay in RAM until later PhysicalCryptoRansomStream object is deleted.
In order to use PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class, the process must be privileged (CAP_IPC_LOCK) in order to lock memory, and since Linux 2.6.9, no limits are placed on the amount of memory that a privileged process can lock and the RLIMIT_MEMLOCK soft resource defines the limit on how much memory an unprivileged process may lock.
A detailled description of needed configuration for Linux can be found at Using physical memory in Linux of corporate website.

Click here if you want to read more on … DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 56 bit key, set 1 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 2 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock cipher architecture presents two main formulations:
Dicelock Digested, and
Dicelock Indexed.

These two formulations are implemented through the following concrete C++ classes:
– DiceLockDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockDigested.h and DiceLockDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIndexed.h and DiceLockIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockIVDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockIVDigested.h and DiceLockIVDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIVIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIVIndexed.h and DiceLockIVIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSDigested.h and DiceLockXTSDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSIndexed.h and DiceLockXTSIndexed.cpp)

To achieve its targets, DiceLock makes use of the following:
DiceLock encryption architecture improves symmetric ciphers like block cipher as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Camellia, Serpent or Twofish (with 128, 192 or 256 bit length symmetric keys) with different block cipher operation modes (like CBC, CFB, OFB and XTS-AES) and stream ciphers as HC 128, HC 256, Rabbit, Salsa 20/20 128, Salsa 20/20 256, Sosemanuk 128, Sosemanuk 256 and others.

DiceLock (both configurations) makes use of the following random number tests: Frequency Test, Block Frequency Test, Cumulative Sum Forward Test, Cumulative Sum Reverse Test, Runs Test, Longest Run Of Ones Test, Rank Test, Universal Test, Approximate Entropy Test, Serial Test and Discrete Fourier Transform Test.

Additionally DiceLock Digested configuration makes use currently of following hash digest algorithms: Sha 1, Sha 224, Sha 256, Sha 384, Sha 512, Sha 512/224, Sha 512/256, Ripemd 128, Ripemd 160, Ripemd 256, Ripemd 320, Message Digest 2, Message Digest 4 or Message Digest 5.

Previous version DiceLock-x 8.0.0.1 for Linux incorporated XTS-AES (XEX-based tweaked-codebook mode with ciphertext stealing XTS block cipher operation mode algorithm) for Advanced Encryption Algorithm (AES) for 128 and 256 bit symmetric keys.

New version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is characterized by:
- several minor errors have been fixed,
- DiceLock for Linux is presented as full and complete version and can be downloaded as single package from DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object).

As the new version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is developed, all individual components must be tested and verified, and in this article we verify ARC 4 Discarding class (computing ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm with no initialization vector).

In order to perform by yourself this and all individual component verifications, Linux test driver program CheckDiceLockBaseAlgorithms-x is available to download.

To be able to download DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object) and all test driver programs, care must be taken regarding Export Policy,
any package that contains DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 can only be downloaded within the European Community right now.

At the bottom of the post you can find C++ source code being used to perform this test.

Verified DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux

Verification components:

– Stream encryption cipher algorithm: ARC4_Discarding class
– Discarded initial bytes: 0
– Test set: IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 2
– Bit stream memory management: PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

Memory characteristic used in this test:

PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class makes use of mlock that uses physical nonpaged memory, preventing that memory from being paged to the swap area, so memory is not swapped to hard disk. The pages are guaranteed to stay in RAM until later PhysicalCryptoRansomStream object is deleted.
In order to use PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class, the process must be privileged (CAP_IPC_LOCK) in order to lock memory, and since Linux 2.6.9, no limits are placed on the amount of memory that a privileged process can lock and the RLIMIT_MEMLOCK soft resource defines the limit on how much memory an unprivileged process may lock.
A detailled description of needed configuration for Linux can be found at Using physical memory in Linux of corporate website.

Click here if you want to read more on … DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 2 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 1 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock cipher architecture presents two main formulations:
Dicelock Digested, and
Dicelock Indexed.

These two formulations are implemented through the following concrete C++ classes:
– DiceLockDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockDigested.h and DiceLockDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIndexed.h and DiceLockIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockIVDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockIVDigested.h and DiceLockIVDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIVIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIVIndexed.h and DiceLockIVIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSDigested.h and DiceLockXTSDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSIndexed.h and DiceLockXTSIndexed.cpp)

To achieve its targets, DiceLock makes use of the following:
DiceLock encryption architecture improves symmetric ciphers like block cipher as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Camellia, Serpent or Twofish (with 128, 192 or 256 bit length symmetric keys) with different block cipher operation modes (like CBC, CFB, OFB and XTS-AES) and stream ciphers as HC 128, HC 256, Rabbit, Salsa 20/20 128, Salsa 20/20 256, Sosemanuk 128, Sosemanuk 256 and others.

DiceLock (both configurations) makes use of the following random number tests: Frequency Test, Block Frequency Test, Cumulative Sum Forward Test, Cumulative Sum Reverse Test, Runs Test, Longest Run Of Ones Test, Rank Test, Universal Test, Approximate Entropy Test, Serial Test and Discrete Fourier Transform Test.

Additionally DiceLock Digested configuration makes use currently of following hash digest algorithms: Sha 1, Sha 224, Sha 256, Sha 384, Sha 512, Sha 512/224, Sha 512/256, Ripemd 128, Ripemd 160, Ripemd 256, Ripemd 320, Message Digest 2, Message Digest 4 or Message Digest 5.

Previous version DiceLock-x 8.0.0.1 for Linux incorporated XTS-AES (XEX-based tweaked-codebook mode with ciphertext stealing XTS block cipher operation mode algorithm) for Advanced Encryption Algorithm (AES) for 128 and 256 bit symmetric keys.

New version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is characterized by:
- several minor errors have been fixed,
- DiceLock for Linux is presented as full and complete version and can be downloaded as single package from DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object).

As the new version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is developed, all individual components must be tested and verified, and in this article we verify ARC 4 Discarding class (computing ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm with no initialization vector).

In order to perform by yourself this and all individual component verifications, Linux test driver program CheckDiceLockBaseAlgorithms-x is available to download.

To be able to download DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object) and all test driver programs, care must be taken regarding Export Policy,
any package that contains DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 can only be downloaded within the European Community right now.

At the bottom of the post you can find C++ source code being used to perform this test.

Verified DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux

Verification components:

– Stream encryption cipher algorithm: ARC4_Discarding class
– Discarded initial bytes: 0
– Test set: IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 1
– Bit stream memory management: PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

Memory characteristic used in this test:

PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class makes use of mlock that uses physical nonpaged memory, preventing that memory from being paged to the swap area, so memory is not swapped to hard disk. The pages are guaranteed to stay in RAM until later PhysicalCryptoRansomStream object is deleted.
In order to use PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class, the process must be privileged (CAP_IPC_LOCK) in order to lock memory, and since Linux 2.6.9, no limits are placed on the amount of memory that a privileged process can lock and the RLIMIT_MEMLOCK soft resource defines the limit on how much memory an unprivileged process may lock.
A detailled description of needed configuration for Linux can be found at Using physical memory in Linux of corporate website.

Click here if you want to read more on … DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 40 bit key, set 1 and PhysicalCryptoRandomStream class (memory pages kept in RAM, not swapped to file)

DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 256 bit key, set 2 and DefaultCryptoRandomStream class (default virtual memory management)

DiceLock cipher architecture presents two main formulations:
Dicelock Digested, and
Dicelock Indexed.

These two formulations are implemented through the following concrete C++ classes:
– DiceLockDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockDigested.h and DiceLockDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIndexed.h and DiceLockIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockIVDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockIVDigested.h and DiceLockIVDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockIVIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockIVIndexed.h and DiceLockIVIndexed.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSDigested class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSDigested.h and DiceLockXTSDigested.cpp)
– DiceLockXTSIndexed class (C++ files: DiceLockXTSIndexed.h and DiceLockXTSIndexed.cpp)

To achieve its targets, DiceLock makes use of the following:
DiceLock encryption architecture improves symmetric ciphers like block cipher as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Camellia, Serpent or Twofish (with 128, 192 or 256 bit length symmetric keys) with different block cipher operation modes (like CBC, CFB, OFB and XTS-AES) and stream ciphers as HC 128, HC 256, Rabbit, Salsa 20/20 128, Salsa 20/20 256, Sosemanuk 128, Sosemanuk 256 and others.

DiceLock (both configurations) makes use of the following random number tests: Frequency Test, Block Frequency Test, Cumulative Sum Forward Test, Cumulative Sum Reverse Test, Runs Test, Longest Run Of Ones Test, Rank Test, Universal Test, Approximate Entropy Test, Serial Test and Discrete Fourier Transform Test.

Additionally DiceLock Digested configuration makes use currently of following hash digest algorithms: Sha 1, Sha 224, Sha 256, Sha 384, Sha 512, Sha 512/224, Sha 512/256, Ripemd 128, Ripemd 160, Ripemd 256, Ripemd 320, Message Digest 2, Message Digest 4 or Message Digest 5.

Previous version DiceLock-x 8.0.0.1 for Linux incorporated XTS-AES (XEX-based tweaked-codebook mode with ciphertext stealing XTS block cipher operation mode algorithm) for Advanced Encryption Algorithm (AES) for 128 and 256 bit symmetric keys.

New version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is characterized by:
- several minor errors have been fixed,
- DiceLock for Linux is presented as full and complete version and can be downloaded as single package from DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object).

As the new version DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux is developed, all individual components must be tested and verified, and in this article we verify ARC 4 Discarding class (computing ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm with no initialization vector).

In order to perform by yourself this and all individual component verifications, Linux test driver program CheckDiceLockBaseAlgorithms-x is available to download.

To be able to download DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 so (shared object) and all test driver programs, care must be taken regarding Export Policy,
any package that contains DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 can only be downloaded within the European Community right now.

At the bottom of the post you can find C++ source code being used to perform this test.

Verified DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux

Verification components:

– Stream encryption cipher algorithm: ARC4_Discarding class
– Discarded initial bytes: 3072
– Test set: IETF RFC 6229, 256 bit key, set 2
– Bit stream memory management: DefaultCryptoRandomStream class (default virtual memory management)

Memory characteristic used in this test:

DefaultCryptoRandomStream class makes use of default virtual memory where the system can move pages of physical memory to and from a paging file (swap file) on disk (manipulation of physical memory by the system is completely transparent to applications). Click here if you want to read more on … DiceLock-x 9.0.0.1 for Linux, ARC4_Discarding class (ARC 4 Discarding stream cipher algorithm) verified with IETF RFC 6229, 256 bit key, set 2 and DefaultCryptoRandomStream class (default virtual memory management)